Teen Suicide: Why Are We Losing So Many So Young?

April 18, 2017 / Amy Krolak  / 
suicide prevention, do not give up

Maybe you can relate to this: as a parent, there exists a thin line between what happens to any child and what happens to my child. A tragic event occurs involving my friend’s child, a child in my community, or even a child in the news and I feel it could have been my child. I feel the pain as if it were my child. Teen suicide is one of a parent’s greatest fears. And as an adult who experienced suicidal ideation, it’s unfathomable to me.

When I was in my first year of recovery after hospitalization for severe depression, I used writing as a way to process my pain. I wrote in journal after journal and I began to think of the future and what it had in mind for me. And when I heard about the following story, I thought—maybe my writing could help others?

(Note: for more information on identifying the signs of mental illness, see this post from our suicide prevention series)

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From there to here: A journey of recovery full circle

March 29, 2017 / Amy Krolak  / 
full circle, recovery

Today, I enjoy relaxing in my reclining leather loveseat next to my ten-month-old black lab puppy, Lulu. She rests her warm head on my leg.  I am excited about the impending birth of my first grandchild who is expected later this month. It is now spring and my moods have lifted. On a day like this, with the sun shining and a slight breeze coming in, you would never guess that I am in recovery. On a day like this, it seems impossible that a bit more than 2629 days ago, this day wasn’t going to happen. I thought January 8, 2010, was to be my last day.

My “last” day

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Part 3 – My Story…The Tale of a Good Samaritan

August 17, 2016 / Danei Edelen  / 
project semicolon, good samaritan

My Dance with Death…

If you would see me today, you would never imagine me as a person who had tried to take her own life. That’s the point. According to the National Mental Health Association, a 2000 study conducted by researchers at Johns Hopkins University found that approximately 25 to 50 percent of patients with bipolar attempt suicide at least once  (1).

I will always regret that my family was not educated about my mental illness sooner. Now that I am in recovery, I can rationally understand how life gets busy. But just like my psychologist explained, I was sitting in that pit with my entire psychological house broken into a thousand pieces during that time. I was confused, having difficulty focusing; I felt overwhelmed, vulnerable and afraid. As I watched them seemingly walk blithely away saying, “I’ll be praying for you! Call me if you need anything!” I reached up my arm to stop them but my wrist was missing pieces. I cried for help, but hadn’t put my mouth together yet. I remember endless days of feeling so lonely that it ached in my bones – my foundation crumbling from beneath me. Luckily, a Good Samaritan came along. (more…)

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